Rich - RICH Photography
Jun 12, 2017

Wedding Receptions and Poorly Lit Rooms

8 comments

Edited: Jun 12, 2017

Wedding receptions can be scary to say the least, with the battle of DJ lights, dark lit rooms, poor lighting, ambience and just a whole bunch of terror.

 

As a firm believer that says use natural light when its good...thats a mere 10% of the time, meaning only 10% of your shots are perfect, the other 90% you are technically not happy with.

 

So here are some scary moments made better.

 

The Room:

Under a tent, blue DJ lights, no white lights at all, this set up stayed from speeches through to dancing.

 

The image on the left is natural light, and as you can see, the settings are a recipe for a grainy and terrible photo, besides the scary blue lights.

 

However...the image on the right has a massive reduction in ISO, all the way down to ISO 1250, and the shutter speed at 1/40sec will deliver sharp photos purely because of the flash.

 

Lets take a look at another one with the exact same tent style set up, with no ambient lighting, in this shot we used a 3 light set up to fix the poorly lit room.

 

So you may ask why multiple flashes?

 

Well to answer it simply, 1 flash, would give you the usual, 1 dimension look, it wouldn't create depth. Imagine a straight on flash, kinda like a cell phone shot, now regardless of 1 flash off camera, its still somewhat 1 dimensional.

 

BUT, using multiple flashes to create hair light that can be seen in both the final images creates a much more professional yet REAL feel.

 

Any questions please ask :)

Novarazka Yatawakal
Aug 8, 2017

How you placed the location of the flash? and what flash did you use? studio flash or dedicated camera flash? and can I use dedicated camera flash to create same light as studio flash? and one more, is the flash not bothering people? not flashing to people eyes? please answer my question.. :)

Novarazka Yatawakal
Aug 10, 2017

I'm still waiting you to reply..

Rich - RICH Photography
Aug 15, 2017

Hi Novarazka, generally I use 2 to 3 flashes (I use the Nikon SB910 flashes) with the PocketWizard wireless system. I dont use studio flashes.

 

The flash set up is generally the same, 1 flash rather deeper in the background (if the room is big then there is 2 flashes (1 in the one corner, and 1 in the opposite corner).

Then the main flash is in the center (or close to) of the room/area. This allows me to move around, never changing flash power but rather positioning myself correctly.

 

The flash doesnt bother people, also remember, your client needs to understand, they provided the dark room, you there to make it look photographically correct :)

trinakosterphotography
Aug 20, 2017

The 3 light flash clearly makes a huge difference in the clarity of those photos.

I've got some good example of flash photography versus natural light photography from some wedding venues in Guelph that I photographed at. Check it out.

Rich - RICH Photography
Aug 21, 2017

Thanks for the comment :) will definitely check it out.

Novarazka Yatawakal
Aug 23, 2017

i get it now.. thanks for the tips.. now I'm confident to do photograph in poor light condition..

Rich - RICH Photography
Aug 23, 2017

Glad I could help :)

New Posts
  • Rich - RICH Photography
    Oct 28

    Well, is LED lights better than flash...the answer isn't that simple, so here's some pros and cons for you to make the easiest decision. Pros: Controlled light, it is SO easy to see your final shot, after all with LED lights, what you see is what you get. Even when you gel them, you see that colour, move the light where you want it and you get the perfect shot every time. Plug-em-In, yes, if you in a studio or near a plug, you can probably plug them in...that means no worrying about flat batteries or recycle time. Cons: Slow shutter or High ISO, a flash helps freeze your subject, even in a low lit situation you always get sharp images, thats because a flash pulses so fast it freezes that image on your sensor, with LED lights, you have to either use a slow shutter or higher ISO. They not that bright, relating to the above Con, LED lights aren't that bright, I know when you look into them you feel blinded, but thats the effect of an LED. A flash can be pointed to the ceiling and light up and entire room, an LED...not so much! Battery power, flashes don't use much battery between shots at all, almost nothing. Ive left my flash in my bag on and the next day it has power, LED lights unfortunately use a lot of batteries as they always on. They large, yeah, to get some decent amount of light out of them, you need a large LED light...they take up a lot of bag space...so great for a studio, perhaps not so much for location. They blind you, when I said they not that bright, it's true, the light doesn't travel like a flash, but when they on pointed at your subject, they insanely bright, chances are, your model might need a pair of sunglasses. So it may seem their are far more cons than Pros to an LED light...and its the reality of it...however, the 1 Pro that is awesome is that your light is controlled, shooting flash for inexperienced photographers can almost feel like a 'shot in the dark' no pun intended. I hope this helps, any questions, drop them in the comments below.
  • Rich - RICH Photography
    Aug 21, 2017

    Let's hear where you biggest struggle is with flash? Although we have numerous tips and tricks coming up we would love to hear from you. Perhaps its during the day, maybe wedding receptions, poorly lit rooms, off camera, on camera, softboxes, modifiers? Drop a comment below and we can start a new thread dealing with common problems.